eLearning Brings Vital Information to Nurse-Midwife in Zambia

eLearning Brings Vital Information to Nurse-Midwife in Zambia

A tablet computer showing a scene from an educational game.

As a health care provider in rural Zambia, nurse-midwife Michael Mweetwa Chinene struggled to stay current with evolving best practices in HIV and tuberculosis care.
“I have a very busy schedule at my facility,” said Chinene, who works in Mazabuka District in the Southern Province, “and it’s difficult to access learning opportunities.”
Yet, the clients Chinene serves—HIV patients with TB—require prompt and correct diagnosis, regular treatment and appropriate case management. Without the ability to get the latest information in patient management, Chinene said his “confidence to be able to provide specific services (for these clients) declined.”

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A Father-Son Example Inspires Trust in VMMC

A male motivator uses a booklet to talk to a group of men about family planning.

In the years Jock Bol has worked to increase men’s access to a highly effective HIV prevention procedure, he has often been asked a profoundly personal question, “Are you circumcised?” Others inquired if Bol would have his young son undergo medical circumcision, which has been shown to prevent the spread of HIV. He hasn’t been shy about answering “yes” to both questions.
Bol, a trained health care provider, is forthright about his own family’s health because he feels strongly that his experience can lead others to understand the impact of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in preventing HIV and to seek out the procedure for their own health.

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Dying to Give Birth

For almost seven years in the 1980s, I lived on Mali’s Dogon Plateau. I was a Peace Corps volunteer focused on primary health care and spent most of my time with women. I learned about their joys, sorrows, dreams, struggles and, surprisingly, their great fear of childbirth.

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